James Betelle, Where Are You?

The Search for a Lost Architect

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Nearly every city built at least one public school with some degree of Gothic decoration. Few of these buildings are masterpieces, but as a whole they form an architectural phenomenon yet to receive adequate study. — The Only Proper Style-Gothic Architecture in America

Entries from October 2006

Essex County Hall of Records

October 31st, 2006 · No Comments · Architecture, Articles

Guilbert & Betelle designed the 1927 Essex County Hall of Records, in Newark, as a complement to the existing 1902 Court House by Cass Gilbert (to which they did the massive remodeling described in this article). Interestingly, James Betelle worked for Gilbert about that time; it’s possible he was involved in its construction as well. […]

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All I Got is a Photograph

October 24th, 2006 · 2 Comments · Architecture, Diary, Miscellaneous

I found this wonderful photograph of the Chamber of Commerce Building in the Newark Library’s photo archive. It works on a both large and small scale, from the full breadth of the building down to fine details at street level. After visiting the building recently I was hoping to find a good period photo, and […]

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The Franklin Murphy House, Newark NJ

October 14th, 2006 · 5 Comments · Architecture, Miscellaneous

The only private residence Guilbert & Betelle designed (that I know of) was the Franklin Murphy House in Newark, New Jersey. Franklin Murphy had quite a life; born in 1846, he fought in the Civil War as a teenager, seeing action at Gettysburg. He went on to found the Murphy Varnish Company in Newark, and […]

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Discoveries at The Grolier Club

October 1st, 2006 · No Comments · Architecture, Articles, Diary

James Betelle wrote articles for countless magazines and journals, but as far as I know, only one book; a forward to a 1933 publication by The Carteret Book Club entitled Colonial Dutch Houses in New Jersey. I suspected the book was rare, as it could only be found in by-appointment collections; no open stacks or […]

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